« Sîdi Ḥámed ĕz-Zarrûq | Main | Abu-Dabar and the Ogre Part II »

12/02/2011

Comments

Lameen

əġărsat-ə́nnes 'his plants', Paradisi translated as 'young palms' but is the plural of Arabic ġarsa(t) 'plant'.: I suspect Paradisi's gloss is correct. In an oasis, palms are the most conspicuous of the few plants that are always (trans)planted (ɣrs) rather than sown (zrʕ).

gan: it looks to me like a lot of sentences in this text make sense only if we assume that gan can simply mean "there".

gafuli: actually, this word is ultimately from Kanuri, though probably via Arabic; it means "sorghum".

"Gedùle": I bet this is an Italian rendition of Arabic jadwal, originally "water conduit" and hence presumably "irrigated land." Adam - does this ring a bell?

əlġábəs: cp. Ouargli/Mzab ɣabəšša, presumably from Arabic ɣabaš "the last part of the night".

săwaní: pl. of Ar. sāniya.

kuwáyəs: kwayyis "good" (we discussed this previously, right?)

gallúda: must be gan "there" + luda "nothing", hence "no match there".

ləhil: a to i in an Arabic loan! Maybe the change is more recent than it looks.

General point: at least in this text, it looks a lot as though -i doesn't appear on words with possessive pronouns.

kato

bẓalím also Ar. bǝṣǝl 'onion', but that seems a pretty unusual form that Awjili's got. how do you analyze it?

săwaní actually pl. from dial. sāniya/sǝwānī 'farm, orchard, garden'

wə́tti from dial. wattī 'to make ready, to prepare' (2nd form of the verb)

yutáya is the 1st form of the above, thus yūtī 'to be ready'. In dial. the act.part. wātī is preferred to the conjugated forms.

əlmətʕat would look f.sg. to me, dial. imtā‘it- (in construct state), if the def.art. weren't there.

ləktuf the plural in ELA is indeed kǝtūf, sg. katǝf

Uṣắlən in ELA yūṣǝl is rather 'to arrive, to reach'

kato

Lameen - spot on, gedùle is probably jadwǝl pl. jǝdāwil 'irrigated plot of land', irrigated with those hand-dug rows of trench things, that is.

ǝlbaqis cf. ELA bǝgis 'twinkle (of a star, etc.)', verb ībǝggis 'to twinkle'

kuwáyəs occurred before, but here it could either be a sort of pause in the narrative, i.e. "they put on clothes, ok, and ..." or an adverbial "they put on clothes well, they dressed nicely, or completely", both of which functions in can have in ELA.

PhoeniX

Lameen:

"gan: it looks to me like a lot of sentences in this text make sense only if we assume that gan can simply mean "there"."

My thought too, although I can't find that at all in Paradisi. It's funny that we've seen that use so many times in this text, while it didn't occur in the others.

"kuwáyəs: kwayyis "good" (we discussed this previously, right?)"

Yes I thought so too, but somehow didn't end up in my notes, and the search function on this blog is terrible. So, sadly I had trouble finding it.

"gallúda: must be gan "there" + luda "nothing", hence "no match there"."

How do you explain the n afíw though. 'he found nothing of fire', do you think it could be considered a negation of wa n afíw 'that of fire', which may have the meaning 'match' (doesn't have an attestation, of course)

Adam:
"bẓalím also Ar. bǝṣǝl 'onion', but that seems a pretty unusual form that Awjili's got. how do you analyze it?"

This word is commonly found in Berber -im is the Punic/Hebrew plural ending. That's why we thing that it's from Punic, not Arabic. Several languages lack the initial b which seems to suggest that it was originally *v, but that's a bit uncertain, but an interesting point.

"əlmətʕat would look f.sg. to me, dial. imtā‘it- (in construct state), if the def.art. weren't there."

I was just trying to explain the ending as -at instead of usually found -ət. This is probably just coloring of ə by ʕ then.

"Uṣắlən in ELA yūṣǝl is rather 'to arrive, to reach'"

isn't that the the dialectal reflex of classical waṣala thought?

I need to sit down later and put all these comments into the text and change the translations. Thanks!

kato

Phoenix:

bẓalím: cool! so, we know that the punics ate onions. what else do we know they ate?

yūṣǝl: yea, it's the dialectal reflex of waṣala; i was just pointing out that the meaning in dialect is 'to arrive' rather than 'to join, etc.'

PhoeniX

"wə́tti from dial. wattī 'to make ready, to prepare' (2nd form of the verb)

yutáya is the 1st form of the above, thus yūtī 'to be ready'. In dial. the act.part. wātī is preferred to the conjugated forms."

Does this verb have a classical cognate?

The comments to this entry are closed.