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07/09/2016

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Mechaniik

Hey, just come across your blog, thanks for taking the time to write it, there's lots of interesting stuff here.

Just to echo what you say in this post, I've come across quite a few similar publications in English and many of those publications use translations which take the same archaicizing approach.

I've recently been living in Saudi Arabia, and if anything the trend I've noticed is that such texts from Saudi are more likely to use this kind of register in the translations than those I've seen from elsewhere (though admittedly the sample size is pretty small).

Possibly this is because of the increased respect for authority and seniority in Saudi culture in general. Or maybe an implicit assumption that others at the very least believe in some god, if not the Muslim one. Since atheism is officially a taboo subject, maybe pamphlets have to be written with a target audience of those who have some faith?

Anyway, it would also be interesting to compare the rate of archaic/archaicizing language in Muslim pamphlets to the equivalent Christian ones (e.g. the Jehovah's witnesses you mentioned). Do you know if there are any other Islamic ones around which do use a more colloquial translation?

PhoeniX

Hey, welcome to my blog, and thanks for the reply.

> Since atheism is officially a taboo subject, maybe pamphlets have to be written with a target audience of those who have some faith?

I wonder. This pamphlet does engage in some anti-atheism rhetoric, so it certainly doesn't seem too taboo. The pamphlet was also made by a Dutch organisation.

> Anyway, it would also be interesting to compare the rate of archaic/archaicizing language in Muslim pamphlets to the equivalent Christian ones (e.g. the Jehovah's witnesses you mentioned). Do you know if there are any other Islamic ones around which do use a more colloquial translation?

I wonder indeed. By now, even the statenvertaling has received some linguistic updates in recent editions. I should stay on the lookout for some pamphlets soon, I'll check it out. Would be a nice follow-up blogpost.

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