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10/31/2011

Comments

kato

issə́lləm 'to greet' 3sg.m.pf. probably < Ar. īsellǝm 'to greet', rather than being denominal, unless you mean the Awjili vb. is from the Ar. vb. which itself is probably denominal.

yənšə́d 'to ask' 3sg.m.pf. < eastern Libyan yinšid 'to ask' (actually, how widespread is this verb in Berber?)

ġar I'd think would be related to dialectal ġēyr 'just, only'. if you were to translate that sentence into eastern Libyan, one outcome could be lā, ġēyr šiftak lābis kābūṭ ...etc. "no, just (that) i saw you wearing a coat..."

oh, and əlqăbbúṭ 'coat' is sometimes kābūṭ and sometimes ankābūṭ in eastern Libyan. Don't think it's originally Arabic though, maybe Turkish?

PhoeniX

Concerning issə́lləm:

I did expect that the Aujili verb would actually be a loan from Arabic, but Classical Arabic doesn't know this verb to mean 'to greet'. I figured it would exist in dialectal arabic, but I don't have access to a Libyan Arabic dictionary.

Which is exactly why I'm so glad several readers are acting as a Libyan Arabic dictionary for me. haha.

As for yənšə́d:

Haven't seen it before in another Berber language, but I would be surprised if it isn't used by any other Berber language.

"ġar i'd think would be related to dialectal ġēyr 'just, only'."

Yes, without a doubt.

"oh, and əlqăbbúṭ 'coat' is sometimes kābūṭ and sometimes ankābūṭ in eastern libyan. don't think it's originally arabic though, maybe turkish?"

Thanks for pointing me in that direction. It appears that you are right. Turkish has kaput for 'coat'.

This, in itself, is interesting because that actually looks like a loanword from Latin caput 'head' but also 'top'. Maybe not directly from Latin, but through some Romance language eventually got to mean 'covering of head' > 'coat'.

kato

Well, there isn't a Libyan Arabic dictionary, so glad we can be of help! I think you should look more at dialectal forms rather than classical, but you've already mentioned the problem of there not being dialect dictionaries.

regarding Tk. kaput, I wouldn't be surprised about an origin in Lat. caput, though I don't know enough about Turkish to be able to tell you if it looks originally Tk. or not. but speaking of Lat. caput, somebody once etymologized dialectal Algerian kābūya 'pumpkin' as being from Lat. caput, i.e. pumpkins look like heads. a bit spurious if you ask me.

This text (and Awjili as a whole) is really full of Arabic words. another thing, from the first line

ixăṭṭám 'to meet' is probably from dialectal īxaṭṭǝm ʕalā 'to pick someone up, to drop by smn.'

PhoeniX

"speaking of Lat. caput, somebody once etymologized dialectal Algerian kābūya 'pumpkin' as being from Lat. caput, i.e. pumpkins look like heads. a bit spurious if you ask me."

Whatever the accuracy of that etymology, it certainly is appropriate to mention in a post put up the day after Halloween.

Yeah Aujili, as much Berber languages, is completely filled with Arabic. Makes me regret I never got round to taking a class in maghrebine Arabic. My classical Arabic knowledge doesn't really cut it.

"ixăṭṭám 'to meet' is probably from dialectal īxaṭṭǝm ʕalā 'to pick someone up, to drop by smn.'"

Nice! Although I'm incredibly curious what this word actually comes from. The only word I can find with this root i classical Arabic is xaṭm 'nose, snout, muzzle', I doubt it has anything to do with that.

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